Pigpen Profile, Upcoming Performance

Pigpen Profiles: FML Writers & Actors

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Laughing Pig is powering through the remainder of our 18-19 season with the speed and determination of a pedicab driver who’s short on rent.

Tonight we open our third Monologue Cafe, where writers submitted themed monologues to be performed by talented local artists. This time it’s all about those classic tales of shame and absurdity we call #FML.

To get us in gear, we have continued our artist spotlight series with three tag teams of writers and performers you can see this weekend and next: Luke and Sergio, Alina and Shannyn, & Cynthia and Lydia. Hey

Luke Gomez – Writer:

What is your background with writing?
I started writing in high school nobody told me to stop throughout high school and now so if you don’t like my monologue that’s on them. I’ve had a quite a few of my plays performed in Phoenix but it’s been a hot minute.
How did the FML theme inspire you?
Well it made me think back on some rather unfortunate times, mostly hilarious in retrospect but at the time were not. I went with one that felt pretty funny at the time too.
Why is it important to share our lessflattering moments?
Our embarassments are ways we can sometimes feel out of control or even lower than others. If you own them, it becomes like an armor. I think thats a Game of Thrones quote.
Was there another story you considered sharing, but held back on?
Theres a lot, most of them booze related. There was one time I got lost in the woods and another time I woke up with a stop sign. There’s also a lot of non booze stories but not as funny.
What are you expecting from the performance?
I’m hoping the audience properly laughs at my dumbness.

Sergio Hans Martinez – Performer 

• What is your background with acting?
I was involved in theater in high school, but in the nine years since, I haven’t done any acting until now.
• What was your reaction to the piece you received?
When I first saw my piece I found it difficult to relate to, as I myself am not prone to blackout drunk moments. But then as I read into it, I realized that the monologue is also about the awkward situations this guy got into and the effort he was willing to put forward to avoid catastrophic embarrassment. And I think we can all see ourselves in that.
•Why is it important to share our less-flattering moments?
I think sharing embarrassing or shameful moments helps others get through tough times, and that’s always good. That being said, there are a few stories that are better kept to ourselves.
• Did this experience remind you of any of your own experiences?
At my drunkest, I too have made coworkers uncomfortable, destroyed property, and urinated in plain view of innocent bystanders. The difference between these stories and my monologue are that they are among my best memories!
•What are you expecting from the performance?
Ideally, I will be scouted at this performance to play Aegon Targaryen in the new Game of Thrones spinoff series. In the unlikely event that doesn’t happen, I have no backup plan.

Alina Rios – Writer:

What is your background with writing?
I’m a published poet and fiction writer and have been writing since I can remember myself, although I began writing in Russian (my first language). I discovered playwriting in 2017 and am completely head over hills with this medium. I have been living and breathing plays since.
• How did the FML theme inspire you?
It’s a brilliant display of character isn’t it, to see them deal with embarrassment. It tells so much in so little time.
 
•Why is it important to share our less-flattering moments?
Because we need to be reminded that we are all only human. We’re not alone in this.
 
•Was there another story you considered sharing, but held back on?
Yes, but it was too long.
 
•What are you expecting from the performance?
I’m hoping it is a slow and steady burn, and I hope that by the end, it hits you in the stomach, and you connect.

Shannyn Hall – Performer:

• What is your background with acting?
I’ve had a love for acting my whole life and started performing in plays at school and summer camp before I was 10. When I was 11, I filled in for a middle aged woman in a completely age-inappropriate community theatre play in which I played the father of a teen hippie played by an 80-year-old woman. It should go without saying that from that moment was born a lifelong love affair so great it would make peanut butter and jelly jealous.
• What was your reaction to the piece you received?

It was disheartening to see one woman unravel and pity herself for not being like a woman that she found enviable. It undermines her decisions on how she lives her life and minimizes her feelings on what she finds important. She seems to be more embarrassed by her own lack of self worth in comparison than any actual event.

•Why is it important to share our less-flattering moments?
Our less-flattering moments are real and sharing them is what connects us. No one is safe from experiencing them, no matter how glamorous their lives may seem. Those are the moments that make us laugh or cry, they evoke the very thing we want to feel from seeing a movie or play or reading a good book. They are what make us vulnerable and makes the flattering moments so satisfying. And you know, maybe some of us wouldn’t have much to share if we couldn’t share the less-flattering moments but I’m doing my best ok?
 
• Did this experience remind you of any of your own experiences?
Well I’m the queen of saying the wrong thing. So. Yes.
•What are you expecting from the performance?
That’s the exciting part of performing live, you never know what to expect.

Cynthia Wheeler – Writer

What is your background with writing?
Most of my life, writing has been technical in nature; job related, manuals, newsletters, and instructional. In recent years, I began writing for myself. Its often a exercise in capturing stories from memories. Other times I draw on situations I find myself in currently that strike me as amusing or even ridiculous. Ridiculous is a great place to find humor. I have found performing my writing at storytelling and spoken word events has been the logical next step for me, one activity feeding off the other.
How did the FML theme inspire you?
Embarrassment is universal, relatable and links to vulnerability, another great place to mine humor while contemplating the human predicament. While a lot of my writing is driven by a theme or prompt, I usually have a story or scenario already twisting its way out of my head onto the paper. As the Berry Turns monologue was a fragmented story line I was able to bring into focus with the theme embarrassment.
Why is it important to share our lessflattering
If a story is the shortest bridge between two people, sharing a vulnerability is the short-cut to authenticity.
Was there another story you considered sharing, but held back on?
I have other pieces that could have fit an embarrassed theme but this one really developed in a way that I could disassociate from enough to see someone else as the central character. Writing this monologue was a sort of breakthrough for me.
What are you expecting from the performance?
#1. I hope people are entertained and want to hear the rest of the story, if there is one. Second, I expect to have an awareness that was not available during the writing phase by observing the actor engage in the next phase of the creative process by bringing the monologue to life and the audience response.

Lydia Corbin – Performer

• What is your background with acting?
Well according to my family, I’ve been a drama queen all my life, but #FML is actually my acting debut!
• What was your reaction to the piece you received?
I absolutely appreciated the comedy and depth of this piece, and I’m excited to bring it to life.
 
•Why is it important to share our less-flattering moments?
So many life lessons are birthed out of our less-flattering moments in life, and that crazy experience could be a lesson for you or for others.  In any event, it’s necessary to celebrate the wins and the not so winning moments.
 
• Did this experience remind you of any of your own experiences?
There are definitely some parts of my piece that resonated with experiences in my life.  I actually can identify with bits of ALL the monologues which pretty much tells you that I’ve had a couple of “interesting” experiences. 
 
•What are you expecting from the performance?
You mean besides being discovered and cast in a major motion picture?  I just expect to have fun. and hopefully in doing so, I make the playwright proud and the audience laugh while thinking about their own experience in life. 
Tickets are still available for all four performances! We can’t wait to impress you!
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